Amy Bramuchi

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Spartacus Legal comment
Amy Barmuchi’s story reeks of revenge, poor training and cover-up by the Alpharetta Police Department. It took 18 months for Amy to be indicted for Aggravated Assault on a Police Officer and other charges. The fact that Amy was responsible for an Alpharetta P.D. Lieutenant facing criminal charges and resigning puts this incident in a totally different light than what police are telling. Amy is now being called to court for a bond revocation hearing. The Alpharetta P.D. is claiming she is harassing them.

Amy Bramuchi is currently a state licensed Massage Therapist, with a focus in Neuromuscular therapy. She also practices Swedish Massage, Deep Tissue Massage, Sports Massage, Reflexology, La Stone Therapy Massage, Somatic Mobilization, Myofascial Release, Massage for Fibromyalgia, Pharmacology for Massage, Manual Lymphatic Drainage, and Lypossage Zones I, II, and III.

Amy has been in massage practice for sixteen years, including opening her own massage practice that included corporate on-site chair massage, in office massage, body wraps and scrubs, a retail line and Lypossage. Additionally, Amy was the Lypossage regional Manager and Trainer for the State of Georgia. Amy has been a member of the American Massage Therapy Association since 1999, became Nationally Certified in 2002, and State licensed when the Georgia Board of Massage was founded in 2005. She is a member of the NAPW (National Association of Professional Women), and has been a member of the Associated Bodywork and Massage Professionals since 2012. A large part of her practice is working with top-notch personal trainers to help them improve their clients overall health and fitness.

Amy has been a Certified Personal Trainer herself since 2004, and became a 200-hour Certified Yoga Instructor in 2011. Amy became a Certified Life Coach in 2013, and an Ordained Minister in early 2015. She has also been a competitive figure contestant, and holistic health consultant. She currently works with children with behavioral health issues, teaching them yoga, guided meditation, and relaxation techniques in a fun, relaxing environment.

Amy had a difficult childhood herself and feels she can relate to kids experiencing problems at home and in school. She learned art therapy, music therapy, interpersonal relationship therapy, traditional talk therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy. In her experience, Amy has found therapy, combined with yoga and meditation, yields the best results.

In September of 2013, a friend Amy was in a fight with maliciously called police and told them she was suicidal and owned a gun. The caller neglected to state that Amy also had a concealed carry permit for her guns. Amy was not feeling well that day and took her prescribed sleeping medications (ambien and klonopin) and went to bed. The suicide threats call was placed about 6 pm. At approximately 6:20 pm, police broke into Amy’s home, while she was sleeping. Upon waking she encountered the police, weapons drawn, just outside her bedroom door. She was asked to show her hands and frisked.

They then walked her downstairs where Amy saw the damage to the front door where it had been kicked in. Four police officer initially broke in, within 3 minutes upon entry there were nine police officers in her home. A total of 14 police officers, 2 medics and 3 fire department personnel, were dispatched to Amy’s home – for a total of 19 personnel, to deal with a 100 lb., 5’2” yoga instructor, massage therapist, personal trainer and life coach.

Amy panicked and attempted to call 911, because officers were not disclosing what Amy had done. The 911 operator instructed Amy to speak to the Lieutenant on duty. So, she asked to speak to just one officer and have everyone else leave, in order for her to get to the bottom of things. Instead, an officer in the front door with his weapon drawn and pointed at her screamed “NO, YOU’RE GOING TO JAIL OR YOU’RE GOING TO PSYCH EVAL.” Amy had never heard of psych eval and did not know what it was. She panicked and ran back upstairs to her bedroom with no clue what she was going to do. She had hit that basic flight or fight reaction for basic necessary survival. She saw her unloaded gun, and thought to herself “I’d rather be dead than in jail.” She tried to load the gun, but dropped the magazine. By this time officers had entered the room. She bent over to pick up the magazine and as she came back up, two of the officers shot at her multiple times, striking her three times with .45 caliber hollow point bullets.

Officers then called for the medics that were there and they immediately rushed her to the hospital, where she underwent 9 hours of trauma surgery. She suffered a collapsed lung, a shattered sternum, and fractured ribs. She lost a foot of her intestines and had to have multiple blood transfusions. She had a second surgery to remove a lobe of her lung and spent 13 days in ICU and CCU. Amy did not have health insurance at the time. She is now one-half million dollars in debt to the hospital and doctors. She has had only one follow up appointment with both the trauma surgeon and the cardiovascular surgeon. She has not seen a doctor since then.

Amy lost the business she had just opened, Body Studio 360, where she taught adults yoga and personal training. She also lost her job working as a massage therapist. Amy was unable to work for several months. She depleted all her savings, had to go on public assistance for food stamps, and go to food banks just to eat. Many of her neighbors and friends took care of her the first few weeks, but for the most part Amy managed her recovery on her own. She is now trying to open a second company, Kid’s Yoga Inc., where Amy teaches children with behavioral health issues Yoga and Guided meditation. Amy can no longer get into yoga poses, and thus is unable to teach adults yoga.

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